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< Overview manufacturing

Hands free to do your job

You use gestures, voice or even gaze to interact with the HoloLens. That means you don’t have to use a physical component like a computer mouse or a keyboard to interact with HoloLens applications. This implicates that your hands remain free to do your job. Let’s elaborate on how this works.

Hand gestures

A first way to interact with the HoloLens is by using hand gestures. The HoloLens tracks every movement of both your hands in real time, and registers these as certain gestures thanks to AI and computer vision. You can compare this with gestures, like ‘swiping’ on your smartphone. It’s a very natural and intuitive way of interacting.

Voice

Just like gestures, your voice can be used to interact with the HoloLens. You can compare this with using Siri, Alexa or Google Assistant. Microsoft trained the HoloLens’ voice recognition by making it ‘listen’ to podcasts for over 80 hours in an anechoic chamber. As a result, the device recognizes certain words as commands, even in industrial, harsh conditions with background noise from jackhammers or grinding wheels for instance. A series of standard voice commands work ‘out-of-the-box’, but custom voice commands can also be created.

Gaze

Thanks to eye tracking, HoloLens knows at all times where you are looking at. This facilitates two features:

  1. All information is projected within a certain field of view. This is what we call the ‘holographic window’. By tracking your eyes, the HoloLens will adapt this window related to where your eyes are looking at, leaving your hands free to do the job.
     
  2. Eye tracking can also be used for automatic scrolling or navigation. By knowing where you are looking at, or what you are reading, the HoloLens can ‘scroll’ through content at your own pace.
Niels Leunen

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